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Submission Preparation Checklist

As part of the submission process, authors are required to check off their submission's compliance with all of the following items, and submissions may be returned to authors that do not adhere to these guidelines.
  • The submission has not been previously published, nor is it before another journal for consideration (or an explanation has been provided in Comments to the Editor).
  • The submission file is in OpenOffice, Microsoft Word, PDF or RTF document file format.
  • Where available, URLs for the references have been provided.
  • The text is single-spaced; uses a 10-point font; employs italics, rather than underlining (except with URL addresses); and all illustrations, figures, and tables are placed within the text at the appropriate points, rather than at the end.
  • The text adheres to the stylistic and bibliographic requirements outlined in the Author Guidelines.

Author Guidelines

AUTHOR GUIDELINES

SCIENTIFIC ARTICLES SUBMITED TO THE "LAW REVIEW" JOURNAL MUST MEET THE FOLLOWING REQUIREMENTS:

  1. The typical length of an article is from 6 000 up to 8 000 words. Longer or shorter texts will be accepted only in exceptional cases.
  2. In “Law Review” articles are published in Lithuanian or other language (English, French, German, Russian, etc.).
  3. Author together with the article must provide key words and short summary of the article in the same language in which an article is prepared. This summary should be no less than 200 words.
  4. Articles prepared in Lithuanian language must have a detailed summary in the end of the article and key words in English. Articles prepared in foreign language must have summary in the end of the article and keywords in Lithuanian. This summary must be no less than 400 words.
  5. Footnotes and citations must be provided in accordance with documentation system requirements.
  6. Legal references shall be provided in the end of the article.
  7. Articles are reviewed anonymously. Articles are usually reviewed by two reviewers. One of them is from editorial team; this reviewer verifies if the article fulfills formal requirements. The other one is scientist or someone who practices law in a specific field that is related to problem which is analyzed in the article.

DOCUMENTATION SYSTEM REQUIREMENTS

Contributors are requested to follow Humanities Style (advisably as regulated by The Chicago Manual of Style) for the formatting of references, with the following general instructions and specific rules:

 

  1. Full references to works cited shall be provided in documentary footnotes (with the exception of abbreviated references; see instructions below) as well as in a bibliographical list provided at the end of the document.
  2. Documentary notes are to be listed as footnotes (not endnotes).
  3. Authors should consider that “[a] footnote … generally lists the author, title, and facts of publication in that order. Elements are separated by commas; the facts of publication are enclosed in parentheses. Authors’ names are presented in standard order (first name first). … In a bibliography entry the elements are separated by periods rather than by commas; the facts of publication are not enclosed in parentheses; and the first-listed author’s name, according to which the entry is alphabetized in the bibliography, is usually inverted (last name first)” (The Chicago Manual of Style, 16th edition (Chicago and London: The University of Chicago Press, 2010), p. 661).
  4. A bibliographical list shall be provided at the end of the manuscript, generally arranged in alphabetical order and called “LEGAL REFERENCES”.
  5. A bibliographical list may be broken into sections.
  6. The page information in the case of a book or congenerous source is provided at the end of the corresponding footnote reference after the comma.
  7. The page information in the case of a journal/newspaper/etc. article is provided at the end of the corresponding footnote reference after the colon.
  8. The page information in the case of a book/compendium/etc. article is provided after the title of the article after the colon and before the information on the book/compendium/etc.
  9. In a footnote reference the page information to the article as a whole is not provided but in a bibliography entry first and last pages shall be given after the colon in all cases.
  10. The titles of legislative acts, cases and other congenerous legislative sources should be provided in italics.
  11. Authors should avoid citing an internet source if a legislative act or a case is available in an official print source.
  12. Examples of the reference to a legislative act and a case serve only as the recommendation in relationship to other countries apart from Lithuania. Authors should as much as possible abide by the rules of the corresponding country or organization in relation to the citation of these sources, however, country or organization should be evident from the reference; if that is not the case, authors should provide additional information indicating the country or organization in parentheses at the end of the reference (for example: Polish case, Latvian statute, the UN resolution, etc.).
  13. The information about the part of a legislative document (as article of statute, etc.) is provided in the end of the corresponding footnote reference after the comma.
  14. The information about uniform resource locator (URL) or digital object identifier (DOI) is provided at the end of the corresponding footnote reference or bibliography entry after the double leaning dash. Only one information source – URL or DOI – should be provided with the preference to DOI if both are available. Access date could be provided but it is not necessary.
  15. LR uses two main tools/identifiers to format subsequent citations: (1) ‘supra note …’ identifier is used to refer to a work cited in the specific note before; in this case, author of the work cited and/or, if not enough/suitable, shortened title information should be provided before the identifier; (2) ‘ibid.’ identifier is used to refer to a single work cited in the note immediately preceding. Page or congenerous information could be provided after identifiers if necessary. All other tools for formatting subsequent citations (especially as op.cit. or loc.cit.) should be avoided.
  16. It is strongly advisable to provide English translations of the titles of books, articles, legal documents or other sources, if they are in a language other than English. The translations should be provided in brackets immediately following the title. For example: Carl Schmitt, Politische Theologie. Vier Kapitel zur Lehre von der Souveranität (Political Theology. Four Chapters on the Concept of Sovereignty), Siebente Auflage (Berlin: Duncker & Humblot, 1996).

EXAMPLES OF THE MAIN TYPES OF REFERENCES

  1. Book

In note: Carl Schmitt, Legality and Legitimacy, trans., ed. Jeffrey Seitzer (Durham & London: Duke University Press, 2004), 28.

In bibliography: Schmitt, Carl. Legality and Legitimacy. Translated and edited by Jeffrey Seitzer. Durham & London: Duke University Press, 2004.

 

  1. Article in a journal

In note: Lon L. Fuller, “Positivism and Fidelity to Law – A Reply to Professor Hart,” Harvard Law Review 71 (1958): 632.

In bibliography: Fuller, Lon L. “Positivism and Fidelity to Law – A Reply to Professor Hart.” Harvard Law Review 71 (1958): 630-672.

 

  1. Article in a book/compendium

In note: Richard Gowan, “The European Security Strategy’s Global Objective: Effective Multilateralism”: 42; in: Sven Biscop and Jan J. Anderson, eds., The EU and the European Security Strategy (London and New York: Routledge, 2008).

In bibliography: Gowan, Richard. “The European Security Strategy’s Global Objective: Effective Multilateralism”: 42-62. In: Sven Biscop and Jan J. Anderson, eds. The EU and the European Security Strategy. London and New York: Routledge, 2008.

 

  1. Article in a journal with DOI

In note: Geoffrey Pridham and Evald Mikkel, “Clinching the ‘Return to Europe’: The Referendums on EU Accession in Estonia and Latvia,” West European Politics Vol. 27, No. 4 (September 2004): 745 // DOI: 10.1080/0140238042000249958.

In bibliography: Pridham, Geoffrey, and Evald Mikkel. “Clinching the ‘Return to Europe’: The Referendums on EU Accession in Estonia and Latvia.” West European Politics Vol. 27, No. 4 (September 2004): 716-748 // DOI: 10.1080/0140238042000249958.

 

  1. Internet source

In note: UNDP, “Civil Service Training in the Context of Public Administration Reform. A Comparative Study of Selected Countries form Central and Eastern Europe, and the former Soviet Union (1989 to 2003),” (May 2003) // http://unpan1.un.org/intradoc/groups/public/documents/UNTC/UNPAN017191.pdf.

In bibliography: UNDP. “Civil Service Training in the Context of Public Administration Reform. A Comparative Study of Selected Countries form Central and Eastern Europe, and the former Soviet Union (1989 to 2003).” (May 2003) // http://unpan1.un.org/intradoc/groups/public/documents/UNTC/UNPAN017191.pdf.

 

  1. Legislative act

In note: Law on Higher Education of the Republic of Lithuania, Official Gazette (2000, no. 27-715), art. 14, sec. 3.

In bibliography: Law on Higher Education of the Republic of Lithuania. Official Gazette, 2000, no. 27-715.

 

  1. Case

In note: State v A.K., Supreme Court of the Republic of Lithuania (1995, no. 2K-257).

In bibliography: State v A.K. Supreme Court of the Republic of Lithuania, 1995, no. 2K-257.

 

  1. Subsequent citations

Footnotes:

  1. Benedict de Spinoza, Theological-Political Treatise, ed. Jonathan Israel, trans. Michael Silverthorne and Jonathan Israel (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2007), 204.
  2. , 209.
  3. Benedict de Spinoza, supra note 3, 184.

 

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